Fuck the Achievers

Posted: June 6, 2014 by jennroig in Commentary, English
Tags: , , , , , ,

Theater-MasksI am actively seeking for a full time job. I’m not totally broke, I’m freelancing here and there, but I’ve been definitely on the market for a full time gig for quite a while by now.

So, my resume is in every job board site I know. Just yesterday I sent an application through yet another site and a bit later I was receiving a mail with a “free critique” of my resume. In fact, they even scored with a 74% my chances for a hiring manager to notice me.

It literally said:

Unfortunately, your existing resume gives the impression that you are a “doer” and not an “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task-based and not results-based – telling what you did, rather than illustrating what you achieved.

At the beginning, this made me smile. I’m a journalist, I’ve been working as a reporter and my task and my result are basically the same: gathering information, reaching out to sources, fact checking and writing pieces for publication. I’d say my editors seem to be happy about the way I handle tasks and the results I deliver, considering they haven’t got rid of me so far. I thought this analysis was probably made by some machine and it was an automatic response from a company that actually charges for “professional resume writing”.

But certain anger has been growing inside me since yesterday.

Cultural, political, social and economic patterns have been dividing us for a long time into winners and losers. Now a new binomial category has joined the party: we are either “doers” or “achievers”. And you know what? Fuck the achievers!

I refuse to succumb to the constant pressure of “achieving”. It sounds to me like we are all forced to run this crazy sprint for the next goal. We need to count, to measure our success in numbers and then brag about it. Once you reached/achieved a goal, then you need to get ready for the next pursue.

I don’t like it. I don’t buy it. I take a stance on the side of the “doers”. I believe the doer will get the job done, and will do it in a fair manner, without screwing up anyone on the process. Probably doers tend to have better chances to actually enjoy the task they are carrying out.

Furthermore, I’m afraid of achievers, specially those who feel the need to count how much they got in return, and then tell everybody about it. Think for a minute, try to remember someone that fits that profile. How do you actually like him/her?polls_Einstein_tongue_4855_988629_poll_xlarge

What if Florence Nightingale or Mahatma Gandhi were asked whether they had considered themselves as doers or achievers? I can’t even imagine them indulging the answer. And those are the kind of people I tend to look up to. In my field, nowadays, I can’t figure what Nick Davies would answer to that. He probably would start laughing.

Every brilliant person I have ever known, those with an actual list of achievements, didn’t need to wear a tag to inform it. It was something I discovered while getting to know them. And that’s what makes them fascinating people. In fact, most of them weren’t seeking for any recognition at all, that was something that just came as bilateral product. They were rather focused on learning something new, facilitating a complicated process, crafting a solution to a problem and then sharing it. The most successful people I know and have heard about, they have that in common. They were doers, achievements happened because they were working hard on their tasks.

I don’t trust achievers. Quantity doesn’t necessarily relate to quality. And if counting is your only point of reference for a good result, you will be likely more inclined to lie about it. Moreover, at least in my field, I’m positive the best piece of journalism is not the one receiving a boost in Web traffic.

I hope some employers out there might still be able to relate to values, skills and experience, not only to a collection of “results”.

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Comments
  1. Tamara says:

    100% contigo. Que les den

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